April: Why on earth are you still using cling film?

My previous plastic rants have appeared on Facebook where I’ve looked at how you can start cutting back on your plastic consumption by getting rid of straws, using paper bags rather than sandwich bags, and putting your money where your mouth is and stop buying food stuffs in plastic bottlers / containers whenever you can.

This month the focus is on cling film.  I haven’t bought cling-film for nearly 2 years and see no reason why anyone needs to buy cling-film ever again; it’s one of those products that solved a problem that never existed in the first place, and now many people feel that they can’t live without it.  But giving up cling-film is so easy, and it will save you money.

Plate & bowl

What about the blindingly obvious? If you’ve got left-over food what’s wrong with the old fashioned plate and bowl method – just put the left-over food in a bowl, and pop a plate over the top. Its would, quite frankly, be crazy not to.

bowls
Blindingly obvious, yet effective and cost free

Storage jars

There is no rule that exists that says ‘you must put your left-over food in a specially designed vessel’.  So, if you’ve got some Kilner or Mason jars hanging around, some wide-necked jam or pickle jars, why don’t you just use them?  If you have existing ‘tupperware’ then use that, and if you need to go and buy any storage containers then why not think about buying some glass ones rather than plastic?  Ikea and Pyrex both sell a great range.

Brown paper bags

Brown paper bags are cheap and effective.  I use them for the kids sarnies, covering up opened packets of cheese or cold meats, and I also have a wodge of them in my shopping bag to put my loose fruit and veg in at the supermarket.  Lots of online shops sell them, including Amazon where you can buy 10 x 10 inch bags for less than £3.00 per 100.

Beaded covers

I can remember my grandmothers larder, a cold room at the back of the house where all the food was kept, and keeping the flies off the food were circles of cotton and lace weighted down with beads.  You can buy these from retailers like Lakeland or you can pick them up second-hand.

Beeswax covers

Although not suitable for vegans, there are lots of companies producing ready-made beeswax covers, including beeswaxwraps.co.uk, who use beeswax from their local Beekeeper Keith, pine resin and organic jojoba oil to make their wraps.  You can also make your own and this little blog post from Moral Fibres explains how.  Both of these sites also explain how you can make snack pouches and boxes from the wraps, and how to take care of and clean them so they last and last.

beeswax-wrap-snack-pouch
Make your own bees wax wraps, and learn how to make snack pouches: picture from http://moralfibres.co.uk/beeswax-food-wrap-diy/
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